Pure Life Physiotherapy Surrey BC

# 702-13737 96 Ave

 604-496-4325

# 1-12088 75A

 778-564-7873

Conditions we Treat

Our Departments

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The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has several functions in the knee. It prevents the lower leg from moving forward on the upper leg, it prevents hyperextension of the knee, it helps stabilize the knee in side-to-side movements, and it helps control the amount of rotation of the lower leg at the knee joint. A hard twist or excessive pressure on the ACL can tear it, causing the knee to give out so that it can no longer support the body. Injuries to the ACL occur frequently in sports that involve sudden changes in direction, such as soccer, basketball, and volleyball.

Unless an injured ACL is accurately diagnosed and treated, the cushioning cartilage in the knee could be seriously damaged. Without this cushion, the thighbone and the shinbone would rub against each other, leading to further damage.

Our Clinic’s approach to treating ACL injuries
The goals of therapy for ACL injuries are to decrease pain and swelling, increase range of motion and strength, and return to normal function. Your Our Clinic therapy for ACL injuries may include:

  • Modalities such as laser/ultrasound therapy to help control the inflammation and assist healing
  • Electical stimulation to improve quadriceps contraction
  • Manual therapy techniques to increase the mobility in the tight structures
  • Exercises to improve mobility, strength, balance and coordination
  • Education about behaviors that reduce the stress on the knees, including proper landing techniques after jumping maneuvers
  • Functional retaining to allow sport participation

A sprained ankle results when the ligaments that connect the bones of the foot are stretched beyond their normal limits, causing fibers and small blood vessels to tear. Sprained ankles can occur in the heat of a game or even from a simple misstep while walking. Without proper strengthening exercises and rehabilitation, the ankle joint may remain unstable following a sprain.

Risk factors
Although anyone can sprain an ankle, certain factors increase the risk:

  • Previous ankle injuries and resulting instability
  • Weak lower leg muscles
  • Lack of, or extreme flexibility in the ankle joint
  • Incorrectly fitted shoes
  • Inadequate warm-up
  • Poor balance
  • Excessive stress caused by obesity or abrupt change in direction
  • Inherited flaws in joint design
  • Aging

Our Clinic’s approach to treating ankle sprains
The goals of physiotherapy for ankle sprains are to decrease pain and swelling, increase range of motion, increase strength, and return you to normal function. Depending on the severity of the sprain, your physiotherapy may include:

  • Modalities such as ultrasound, laser or electrical stimulation
  • Bracing or taping to provide support
  • Exercises to restore stability, strength, and balance
  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization
  • Gait, balance and proprioception retraining

Our therapists also educate patients in ways to prevent future ankle sprains, such as wearing appropriate footwear, avoiding activities on slippery or uneven surfaces, warming up adequately, and keeping leg muscles strong.

Plantar Fasciitis
Plantar fasciitis is an irritation of the plantar fascia — the thick, fibrous tissue that runs from the ball of the foot to the heel and supports the arch. This irritation occurs when the collagen that makes up the plantar fascia degenerates as a result of repeated microscopic tears from activities that put excessive stress on this tissue. Plantar fasciitis is characterized by sharp pain at the beginning of an activity or with the first few steps in the morning. This pain, typically felt on the heel and sometimes extending along the bottom of the foot, gradually lessens to a dull ache.

Risk factors
Risk factors for plantar fasciitis include:

  • Age greater than 30
  • Excessive physical activity
  • Obesity
  • Change from high heels to flat shoes
  • Jobs that require standing or walking on hard surfaces
  • Flat feet, high arches, or tight Achilles tendons

Our Clinic’s approach to treating plantar fasciitis
Your physiotherapy for plantar fasciitis may consist of:

  • Evaluation of leg length and gait
  • Custom foot orthotics
  • Heel cups to absorb shock and help decrease the pressure from tight heel cords
  • Night splints to help gently stretch the Achilles tendon
  • Modalities such as ultrasound, laser, phonophoresis, or iontophoresis to help decrease inflammation and pain
  • Exercises that increase the strength and flexibility of the foot and ankle muscles
  • Education about proper stretching techniques and activities to avoid
  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization

A broken, or fractured, ankle is a common ankle condition that results when excessive stress, twisting, or trauma occurs to the ankle joint.

Your ankle joint is made up of three bones: the shinbone (tibia), the lower leg bone (fibula), and the ankle bone (talus). One or more of these bones can break during a fall or blow to your ankle. However, the most common type of broken ankle is a fracture in one of the lateral bumps (each called a malleolus) at the lower ends of the tibia and fibula. These bones help support the joint where your ankle bone connects to your heel bone, which allows your foot to rock from side to side. They’re often injured when your ankle rolls inward or outward.

Risk factors
Risk factors include:

  • Obesity
  • Participation in high-impact sports
  • Use of faulty sports equipment or improper techniques
  • Occupations that put you at risk of falling from a height
  • Home environments that are cluttered or poorly lit
  • Certain conditions such as osteoporosis or neuropathy

Our Clinic’s approach to treating ankle fractures
Our Clinic believes that any foot or ankle injury requires medical attention. Prompt realignment and treatment of any ankle or foot fracture is key to complete healing. Your physiotherapy for an ankle fracture may include:

  • Modalities such as laser or electrical stimulation
  • Exercises to stretch, restore range of motion and strengthen weak muscles
  • Education about behaviors that reduce the stress on your joints
  • Gait, balance and proprioception retraining
  • Manual therapy as indicated

Other Conditions
We also treat conditions such as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction and those that are not necessarily restricted to a single body system. Our goal for these conditions is to design a personalized program—which can include therapy, education, and preventative care—that helps you reach your goals and lead a full and active life.

Arthritis
Arthritis, the nation’s leading cause of disability, is characterized by recurring pain or tenderness in a joint, stiffness or swelling in a joint, obvious redness or heat in a joint, or the inability to move a joint. Most often associated with old age, arthritis is usually caused by wear and tear in the joints. Other common causes of arthritis include:

  • Injuries
  • Prolonged poor posture
  • Overuse of joints
  • Obesity

Our Clinic’s approach to treating arthritis
To date, there are no medical cures for arthritis. However, therapy has proven to be effective in reducing pain, strengthening muscles, and improving movement, posture correction, and independent function — benefits that make arthritis much easier to handle. The most common treatment methods our therapists use include:

  • Gentle passive movement
  • Muscle stimulation
  • Therapeutic exercise
  • Posture, balance and gait analysis
  • Self management techniques to protect the joints
  • Gentle joint and soft tissue mobilization

Back pain affects 8 out of 10 people during their lives. Because the lower back supports much of the body’s weight, it is subject to a significant amount of mechanical stress, which often leads to injury.
Common causes

Back pain often results from routine activities such as gardening, housework, reaching for an object, or even coughing. The most common causes of back pain include:

  • Poor posture
  • Muscle strains
  • Ligament sprains
  • Disc problems
  • Sciatica
  • Arthritis
  • Muscle weakness
  • Stress

Pregnancy also predisposes women to lower back pain. Fifty percent of pregnant women experience lower back pain that not only compromises their ability to work but also interferes with daily activities. Lower back pain can continue after childbirth with the strain of picking up an infant.

Risk factors
Certain factors can increase a person’s risk of having back pain. These factors include:

  • Increasing age
  • Poor physical fitness
  • Excess weight
  • Disease
  • Poor posture
  • Improper body mechanics

Our Clinic’s approach to treating back pain
Physiotherapy treatment can provide relief for people suffering from both acute and chronic back pain. Our therapists assess the cause and type of pain in order to determine the most effective treatment. In addition to treatment, our therapists encourage you to manage your back pain by prescribing specific exercises that you can perform on your own. Your therapy for back pain may include:

  • Advice about early morning activity, and avoidance of aggravating activities
  • Joint, soft tissue and neural mobilization
  • Core stabilization exercises and lower extremity strenghtening
  • Stretching exercises
  • Modalities such as ultrasound/laser, electrical stimulation, spinal traction, ice/moist heat
  • Ergonomic advice
  • Postural advice

A calf muscle strain is a common injury that can occur when you overdo it physically — whether by stretching too far, changing direction or speed abruptly, landing awkwardly, or colliding with another player during a sporting event. A calf strain is a common injury in sports that involve sudden bursts of speed, such as soccer, running, and hockey.

A calf strain usually causes acute pain and occurs during strenuous activity. However, it can develop over days or weeks. Although calf strains often take a long time to recover and the rate of recurrence is high The long-term outcome after a calf strain injury is usually excellent and complications are few.

Risk factors
Factors that increase the risk of calf strains include:

  • Previous calf injury
  • Increasing age
  • Sudden change in direction, acceleration or deceleration
  • Poor strength and flexibility
  • Calf muscle fatigue
  • Inappropriate or inadequate warm-up

Our Clinic’s approach to treating a calf strain
The treatment of a calf strain depends on the severity of the injury. When physiotherapy is initiated, treatment for your calf strain may include:

  • Modalities such as electrical stimulation, ice, ultrasound or laser to help reduce pain and inflammation
  • Gait analysis and instruction in proper biomechanics
  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization
  • Therapeutic exercises to restore flexibility and strength
  • Functional retraining

Overuse, such as too many hours hunched over a desk or a steering wheel, often triggers muscle strains. Neck muscles, particularly those in the back of your neck, become fatigued and eventually strained. When you overuse your neck muscles repeatedly, chronic pain can develop. Even minor activities such as reading in bed or gritting your teeth can strain neck muscles.

Signs and symptoms
Symptoms of cervical strain may include:

  • Muscle discomfort in the neck, upper back, or shoulders
  • Difficulty turning or bending your neck
  • Pain that travels into the shoulder or down the arm
  • Numbness or tingling in the arm, hand, or fingers
  • Muscle weakness in the arm and decreased grip strength
  • Headaches

Our Clinic’s approach to treating cervical strain
Your physiotherapy for cervical strain may include:

  • Modalities such as mechanical traction, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and heat/ice packs to help increase neck mobility and decrease inflammation, muscle spasm and pain
  • Joint, soft tissue and neural mobilization
  • Exercises to help improve posture, stretch tight muscles, and strengthen weak muscles
  • Education about body mechanics to minimize strain on the neck and prevent future occurrences

Shoulder dislocation can occur if the shoulder joint moves or is forced out of its normal position. Problems associated with a dislocated shoulder include tearing of the ligaments and/or tendons that reinforce the joint capsule.

Common signs and symptoms
You may have a dislocated shoulder if your shoulder is:

  • Visibly deformed or out of place
  • Swollen or discolored (bruised)
  • Intensely painful
  • Immovable

Shoulder dislocation may also cause numbness, weakness, or tingling near the injury, such as in your neck or down your arm.
Our Clinic’s approach to treating dislocated shoulders
Your physiotherapy for a dislocated shoulder may include:

  • Modalities such as ultrasound, laser, electrical stimulation, or iontophoresis
  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization
  • Exercises that focus on increasing range of motion and strengthening weak muscles to help prevent recurrent dislocations
  • Education about body mechanics

The elbow is a hinge joint connecting the upper arm bone (humerus) with the bones of the forearm (radius and ulna). It consists of three joints enclosed within a capsule and held together by muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

Many things can make your elbow hurt. A common cause is tendinitis, an inflammation or injury to the tendons which attach muscle to bone. Although tendinitis of the elbow is a sports injury, often from playing tennis or golf, it also often results from other overuse and repetitive activities of the elbow. Other causes of elbow pain include sprains, strains, fractures, dislocations, bursitis, and arthritis.

Elbow pain
The treatment for elbow pain depends on the cause of the pain. General measures that prevent overuse or strain in the elbow include:

  • Taking frequent breaks from activities that require extensive hand and wrist motions
  • Reducing or avoiding the lifting of objects with the arm extended
  • Reducing repetitive gripping and grasping with the hand and wrist
  • Decreasing the overall tension of gripping
  • Avoiding the extremes of bending and full extension of the wrist/elbow
  • Working with the elbow in a partially flexed position

The human foot contains 26 bones, about 13% of the body’s total number. Connecting this set of bones to the lower leg is the ankle, a joint we greatly rely on to provide both stability (supporting our weight while standing) and mobility (allowing us to walk, run, and jump). Considering all that we ask of our feet and ankles, it’s no surprise that this intricate structure is a common site for tears, strains, sprains, and fractures.

Our Clinic’s approach to treating foot and ankle dysfunctions
Your physiotherapy for foot and ankle dysfunctions may include:

  • Assessment of gait and range of motion to detect issues that might contribute to a foot or ankle problem
  • Customized orthotic devices to help support or correct ankle function
  • Education about behaviors that reduce stress on your joints
  • Manual therapy techniques to improve joint biomechanics
  • Exercises including stretching tight musculature and strengthening weak muscles of the lower extremity

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by widespread pain in muscles and joints, particularly in the neck, spine, shoulders, and hips. Because its symptoms are common to many other disorders, it is difficult to diagnose — a situation that frustrates patients and physicians alike.

Although not much is known about what causes this syndrome, we do know that it may be triggered by physical or mental stress, inadequate sleep, an injury, exposure to dampness or cold, or certain infections.

Common symptoms
The most common symptom of fibromyalgia is pain. In addition to pain, other symptoms include:

  • Moderate to severe fatigue
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Numbness and tingling in the extremities
  • Headache and facial pain
  • Bowel or bladder spasm and irritability

Our Clinic’s approach to treating fibromyalgia
Our Clinic’s treatment of fibromyalgia helps relieve pain, restore function, decrease spasm and tension, and empower you to self-manage your condition. Your treatment may include:

  • Gentle therapeutic exercises to increase aerobic capacity and muscle strength
  • Education in body mechanics and posture training
  • Instruction in breathing and relaxation techniques
  • Stretching and manual therapy techniques as indicated for flexibility
  • Modalities such as heat and massage for pain relief
  • Education about ways to reduce stress, practice good sleeping habits, and maintain a healthy lifestyle

People with a “frozen shoulder” experience pain, stiffness, and severely restricted movement of the shoulder. This condition is frequently caused by an injury in which pain leads to lack of use. Rheumatic disease progression and recent shoulder surgery can also cause frozen shoulder.

Contributing factors
Medical conditions and other factors that may increase the risk of frozen shoulder include:

  • Diabetes
  • Hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Cardiac disease or surgery
  • Previous shoulder injury or condition for which the shoulder was immobilized for a period of time

Our Clinic’s approach to treating frozen shoulder
Your physiotherapy for a frozen shoulder may include:

  • Modalities such as ultrasound, laser, electrical stimulation, moist heat/ice
  • Joint, soft tissue and neural mobilization
  • Exercises to increase range of motion of shoulder and scapula, stretch tight muscles/capsule, and strengthen weak muscles
  • Education about body mechanics

When golf professionals assess a person’s golf swing, they focus on the movement of the club. When a therapist assesses a patient who plays golf, the therapist focuses on body motion through the swing rather than the club. This enables therapists to evaluate the biomechanics of the golf swing and pinpoint a problem in the swing that may lead to injuries such as golfer’s elbow.

Golfer’s elbow is pain caused by inflammation on the inner side of the elbow. Golfer’s elbow is similar to tennis elbow except that it occurs on the inside, not the outside, of the elbow. Anyone who repeatedly uses the wrists or clenches the fingers can develop golfer’s elbow.

Our Clinic’s approach to treating golfer’s elbow
The sooner you begin treatment for golfer’s elbow, the sooner you’ll be able to return to your usual activities. Rest is often advised until the severe pain has subsided. Depending on the severity of your condition, the pain may linger for several months, even if you take it easy and follow instructions to exercise your arm. Sometimes the pain returns or becomes chronic.

While you’re recovering, remember to rest! Sneaking in a round of golf before your elbow heals won’t help you feel better – it will only prolong your recovery.

Your treatment for golfer’s elbow at Our Clinic may include:

  • Joint, soft tissue and neural mobilization
  • Modalities such as electrical stimulation, ice, ultrasound or laser to help reduce pain
  • Phonophoresis or iontophoresis as prescribed by your physician
  • Therapeutic exercises to stretch and strengthen the elbow
  • A progression of activities to gradually ease you back to your daily elbow use routine
  • A review of your golf swing and other functional activities
  • Education on proper body mechanics to avoid future injury

Headaches are often caused by disorders of the neck and/or physical and emotional tension. Studies show that cervical headaches account for between 15% and 20% of all chronic and recurrent headaches. Cervical headaches stem from musculoskeletal dysfunctions that include abnormal upper cervical joint mobility, trigger points in the cervical muscles, and decreased strength and endurance in the deep cervical flexors. Cervical headaches are the most common persistent symptom following neck trauma; poor sitting posture and stress are also often associated with headaches of cervical origin.

Our Clinic’s approach to treating headaches

The successful management of headaches relies on an accurate diagnosis of their origin. At Our Clinic, our therapists evaluate your symptoms and look for patterns that point to the cause of your headache.

Depending on the cause of your headache, your physiotherapy may include:

  • Manual therapy to increase joint range of motion, decrease muscle tightness, and release musculoskeletal trigger points to restore pain-free cervical mobility.
  • Neural mobilization to restore neural mobility.
  • Modalities such as ultrasound, laser, electrotherapy, gentle manual traction and heat.
  • Instruction in relaxation techniques.
  • Education about posture and movement to restore neutral joint and muscle position at rest and to facilitate pain-free and stress-free movement patterns.
  • Self-management activities designed to help you maintain normal, pain-free mobility and function.

The vertebrae of the spinal column are separated by discs made of cartilage. The inner portion of each disc is soft, enabling the disc to act as a shock absorber to cushion the surrounding vertebrae during movement. Injury, or wear and tear with aging can cause discs to degenerate and allow the soft inner portion of the disc to rupture through the outer layer. Pain results when this ruptured portion compresses or irritates a nerve root.

Risk factors
Factors that increase the risk of causing a herniated disc include:

  • Improper lifting
  • Obesity
  • Repetitive strenuous activities
  • Weak spinal support structures

Common symptoms
Symptoms of herniated discs, which may be intermittent or constant and long-lasting, include:

  • Pain that radiates down one leg or arm
  • Leg weakness and difficulty walking or lifting the front part of the foot
  • Decreased bowel or bladder control
  • Numbness or tingling in one leg or arm

Our Clinic’s approach to treating herniated discs
Therapy can help relieve pain and restore function whether your herniated disc injury requires surgery or not. Your physiotherapy for a herniated disc may include:

  • Modalities such as electrical stimulation, ultrasound, traction, or iontophoresis
  • Joint, soft tissue and neural mobilizations
  • Core stabilization exercises
  • Ice or heat
  • Exercises to help improve posture, strengthen muscles, increase flexibility, and help with weight loss
  • Education about proper posture and lifting techniques

Preventing Neck Pain
Some simple changes in your daily routine may help prevent neck pain:

  • Use relaxation techniques and regular aerobic exercise to prevent unwanted stress and tension to the neck muscles.
  • Avoid sleeping on your stomach. This position puts stress on your neck. Choose a pillow that supports the natural curve of your neck.
  • Take frequent breaks if you drive long distances or work long hours at your computer.
  • Adopt a neutral posture. Most neck pain is associated with poor posture. The goal of good posture is to maintain your natural spinal curves, keeping your head, shoulders, and hips aligned. Engage your abdominal muscles to actively support your spine.
  • Exercise to strengthen and stretch your neck and upper body, especially if you spend a lot of time in one position.

Your hips, the joints where your thigh bone meets your pelvis bone, are very stable. It takes great force to seriously damage a healthy hip.

A handful of overuse and sports injuries are associated with the hip. Some male adolescents may experience growth-related hip problems, and some women may also face pelvis or hip related difficulties during pregnancy. However, the majority of hip problems are associated with aging, disease, and fractures in the elderly. Elderly people are subject to the most serious problems: life threatening hip fractures that are often due to osteoporosis, the disease that causes brittle bones.

The motion and support of the hip is controlled largely by the muscles of the thighs and lower back. The thigh muscles include the hamstring muscles, located at the back of the thigh, and the quadriceps muscle group, in the front of the thigh. These muscles work to extend the leg at the hip and bend the leg at the knee. When overuse or injury stretches or tears the hamstring muscle fibers, the resulting injury is called a strain.

Treatment for hip and thigh disorders may include rest, medicines, physiotherapy, or surgery including hip replacement.

Hamstring Strain
The “hamstring” is actually a group of three muscles that work with the quadriceps to straighten (extend) the leg at the hip and bend (flex) the leg at the knee. The quadriceps muscles are usually much more powerful than the hamstring muscles. As a consequence, the hamstring may become fatigued faster than the quadriceps, leading to a hamstring strain.

Hamstring strains usually cause acute pain and occur during strenuous activity. However, they can develop over days or weeks. Like calf strains, hamstring strains often take a long time to recover and the rate of recurrence is high. But the long-term outcome after a hamstring strain injury is usually excellent and complications are few.

Risk factors
Hamstring injuries are easier to prevent than to cure. Factors that increase the risk of calf and hamstring strains include:

  • Previous hamstring injury
  • Increasing age
  • Sudden change in direction acceleration or deceleration
  • Poor strength and flexibility
  • Calf or hamstring muscle fatigue
  • Muscle strength imbalance between the quadriceps and hamstrings
  • Inappropriate or inadequate warm-up

Our Clinic’s approach to treating a hamstring strain
The treatment of a hamstring strain depends on the severity of the injury. When physiotherapy is initiated, treatment for your hamstring strain may include:

  • Modalities such as electrical stimulation, ice, ultrasound or laser to help reduce pain
  • Gait analysis and instruction in proper biomechanics
  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization
  • Therapeutic exercises to restore flexibility and strength

A wide variety of disorders result in hip disease that causes pain, limits motion, and restricts a person’s ability to participate in daily activities. Manual physiotherapy and hip replacement surgery can relieve pain and restore function.

Hip replacement surgery
If you require hip replacement surgery, the primary goal of this surgery is to relieve pain. The primary goal of physiotherapy following hip replacement surgery is to restore function.
Our Clinic’s approach to therapy following hip replacement surgery
Joint replacement surgery requires that you take an active role in your preoperative and postoperative care and rehabilitation. Your physiotherapy for hip replacement surgery may include:

  • Gait and balance retraining with assistive devices to limit pain while walking
  • Modalities to help decrease swelling and pain
  • Exercises to increase range of motion, strengthen muscles, and improve balance and circulation
  • Education about behaviors that reduce the stress on the hips
  • Soft tissue mobilization

If your knee pain occurs laterally (that is, on the outside edge of the knee), you may be suffering from iliotibial band, or ITB, syndrome. ITB syndrome occurs when the ligament that extends from the outside of the pelvic bone to the outside of your tibia (iliotibial band) becomes so tight that it rubs against the outer portion of the femur. Distance runners are especially susceptible to ITB syndrome, which generally causes a sharp, burning pain in the knee that often begins 10 to 15 minutes into a run. Initially, the pain goes away with rest, but in time it may persist when you walk or go up and down stairs.

Contributing factors
Contributing factors for ITB syndrome include:

  • Pregnancy
  • Biomechanical problems such as unequal leg length or weak hip abductors
  • Exercising on concrete surfaces or uneven ground
  • Increasing the intensity or duration of exercise too quickly
  • Wearing worn or ill-fitting shoes
  • Excessive uphill or downhill running

Our Clinic’s approach to treating ITB syndrome
Your Our Clinic physiotherapy for ITB syndrome may include:

  • Modalities such as ultrasound/laser to help control the inflammation and assist healing
  • Manual therapy techniques to increase the mobility in the tight structures
  • Assessment and guidance about appropriate footwear
  • Education about behaviors that reduce the stress on the knees
  • Exercises to stretch tight muscles and to strengthen other leg muscles to alleviate continued stress on ITB

A wide variety of disorders result in knee disease that causes pain, limits motion, and restricts a person’s ability to participate in daily activities. Manual physiotherapy and knee replacement surgery can relieve pain and restore function.

Physiotherapy before surgery
Studies have shown that patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who were treated with manual physiotherapy and exercise experienced significant improvements in their perceptions of pain, stiffness, and functional ability. These studies also found that fewer patients in the treatment group required knee replacement surgery.

Knee replacement surgery
If you require knee replacement surgery, the primary goal of this surgery is to relieve pain. The primary goal of physiotherapy following knee replacement surgery is to restore function.
Our Clinic’s approach to therapy following knee replacement surgery

Joint replacement surgery requires that you take an active role in your preoperative and postoperative care and rehabilitation. Your Our Clinic physiotherapy for knee replacement surgery may include:

  • Gait training and balance/ proprioception retraining
  • Modalities to help decrease swelling and pain
  • Exercises to increase range of motion, strengthen muscles, and improve endurance and circulation
  • Functional retraining to allow you to resume your previous ADL’s
  • Education about behaviors that reduce the stress on the knees

Knees are complex, weight-bearing joints that provide your body with flexibility, support, and a wide range of motion. Because of the knee’s complexity and the amount of use it gets over a lifetime, it is susceptible to injury and is a common site of pain.

Although many knee injuries are caused by overuse, problems with alignment, sports or physical activities, and failure to warm up and stretch before exercise, they can also result from trauma such as a car accident, a fall, or a direct blow to the knee. Depending on the type and severity of joint damage, knee pain can be minor or can lead to severe discomfort and disability.

Our Clinic’s approach to treating knee pain
You should seek medical advice if you have pain or swelling of the knee that occurs at night or persists more than a few days, experience a crunching or grinding sound when you place weight on the knee, have difficulty bearing weight, experience loss of motion, or notice instability.

If you require physiotherapy care, your treatment for knee pain may include:

  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization
  • Modalities such as electrical stimulation, ultrasound, laser, or iontophoresis
  • Bracing or orthotics
  • Behavioral modification to decrease wear and tear on the knee
  • Assistance with a weight loss program
  • Exercises for stretching, strengthening and balance/proprioception
  • Education about behaviors that reduce stress on your knees
  • Gait analysis and instruction in proper biomechanics

The neck contains bones, joints, tendons, ligaments, muscles, and nerves. Because the neck is so mobile and less protected than the rest of the spine, it is vulnerable to injury and disorders that produce pain and restrict motion. Neck pain, when experienced, may originate from any of the structures in the neck. It may also come from or cause pain in areas near the neck, such as the shoulder, shoulder blade, jaw (see TMJ also), head, and upper arms.

Neck pain has various causes:

  • Neck injuries and their associated pain often result from motor vehicle, sports, or occupational accidents.
  • Poor posture can cause muscle strain or increased tension resulting in neck pain.
  • Diseases such as arthritis or degeneration of the cervical discs can lead to neck pain and stiffness.

Our Clinic’s approach to treating neck pain
The goal of therapy for neck conditions is to decrease pain and improve function. Your Our Clinic therapy may include:

  • Joint, soft tissue and neural mobilization
  • Modalities such as ultrasound, electrical stimulation, or cervical traction to relax muscles and decrease pressure on the pain reproducing structures
  • Exercises to help improve posture, stretch tight muscles, and strengthen weak muscles
  • Education about posture and body mechanics , and avoidance of aggravating factors

As we age, the amount of calcium in our bones decreases. This lowers the density or mass of our bones, making them porous and brittle — a condition known as osteoporosis. This condition often develops unnoticed over many years, with no symptoms or discomfort, until a fracture occurs — particularly in the hips, spine, or wrists. Factors that increase the risk of osteoporosis include: aging, gender, health disorders, sedentary lifestyle, medications, nutrition, and lifestyle.

Osteoporosis and exercise
Our Clinic believes that some simple changes can help prevent, or minimize the effects of osteoporosis. With your therapist’s knowledge of body mechanics and function, he or she can design an osteoporosis prevention or treatment program that focuses on your unique needs.

Our Clinic’s approach to preventing osteoporosis
Bones, like muscles, get stronger the more they work. Lack of exercise, especially as we get older, can lead to decreased bone density and increased susceptibility to fractures. This is why exercise is so important in preventing osteoporosis.

Two types of exercise have been found to be most beneficial in osteoporosis prevention:

  • Weight bearing exercises include any type of exercise in which your legs bear your weight. Examples of such exercises include walking and dancing. Swimming and cycling are not considered weight bearing exercises because your weight is supported by water or the bicycle seat, not your legs.
  • Resistance exercises are the type of exercises that use free weights or exercise machines to build muscle and bone strength.

Your Our Clinic physiotherapist can help you choose an active lifestyle that includes various physical activities that would combine both types of exercise, leading to healthier bones.

Our Clinic’s approach to treating osteoporosis
Weight bearing and resistance exercises are also appropriate for those who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis. However, high-impact aerobics and exercises that involve spine twisting or bending should be avoided. Before any person with osteoporosis starts an exercise program, we recommend consulting with a specialized physiotherapist to construct an exercise program that adequately challenges the muscles and bones without risking injury and fracture. For those with osteoporosis who also experience problems with balance, we recommend physiotherapy for balance rehabilitation to reduce the chance of falls and fractures.

Patella tendinitis (sometimes referred to as “jumper’s knee”) is an overuse injury that affects the tendon connecting the kneecap to the shin bone. Patella tendinitis occurs when you place repeated stress on your patellar tendon, often when you suddenly increase the intensity or frequency of your workouts. Although patella tendinitis is most common in athletes whose sports involve frequent jumping (for instance, basketball, soccer, and volleyball players), anyone can suffer from this condition. Patella tendinitis may be accompanied by bursitis, which can result in pain when you move or put pressure on the area.

Symptoms
The symptom of patella tendinitis is pain between the kneecap (patella) and the area where the tendon attaches to the shin bone. The pain may:

  • Feel sharp during activity and persist as a dull ache at rest
  • Increase with intensity of activity
  • Make going up and down stairs painful
  • Become a constant ache that can make it difficult to sleep at night

Our Clinic’s approach to treating patella tendinitis
Your treatment at Our Clinic will focus on reducing the strain on your tendon and then gradually building up the tendon’s strength. Your treatment may include:

  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization
  • Modalities such as ultrasound/laser, and electrical stimulation to help to provide pain relief
  • Therapeutic activities and exercises to stretch the inflexible muscles, especially the quadriceps, that can contribute to the strain on your patellar tendon
  • Education on proper body mechanics to help you learn to better distribute the force you exert during physical activity
  • Gradual progression of your exercises to restore function and to allow sport participation

The rotator cuff muscles are responsible for raising, lowering, and rotating the shoulder. Rotator cuff muscles and tendons can tear as a result of trauma, activities involving repeated overhead motion, or weakness and degeneration associated with aging. Most rotator cuff tears produce no symptoms, but some can lead to major pain and disability requiring treatment (physiotherapy and/or surgery).

Common symptoms
Symptoms of rotator cuff tears include:

  • Pain that increases with movement such as reaching overhead or lifting
  • Deep ache at night that makes the shoulder painful to lie on
  • Loss of strength
  • Atrophy (wasting of muscle mass)
  • Decreased range of motion when reaching behind the back or across the body
  • Complete inability to hold arm elevated

Our Clinic’s approach to treating rotator cuff tears
Therapy can help relieve pain and restore function whether your rotator cuff injury requires surgery or not. Your physiotherapy for a rotator cuff tear may include:

  • Modalities such as ultrasound, laser, electrical stimulation, or iontophoresis
  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization
  • Exercises to help improve posture and stretch and strengthen shoulder muscles
  • Education about body mechanics and proper posture to alleviate stress on the rotator cuff muscles

The shoulder comprises several joints that are held in place by tendons, muscles, and ligaments to allow a wide range of motion to the arm. It is the most mobile and one of the most potentially unstable joints in the body.

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, approximately 6 million people seek help for shoulder pain each year. When experienced, shoulder pain may be localized, felt in areas around the shoulder, or down the arm. Causes of shoulder pain include age-related degeneration of the surrounding soft tissues, strain and overuse activities, and trauma.

Contributing factors:
Many factors contribute to the risk of shoulder injury, including overuse with repetitive overhead motion, muscle weakness, improper technique during a sports or work activity, previous injury, and inherited factors.

Common shoulder problems:
Most shoulder problems involve many different structures, such as the soft tissues, muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The symptoms and treatment of shoulder problems vary depending on the problem.
Early detection is the key to preventing serious shoulder injuries. You should seek medical advice if pain is consistent or intense, especially at night, or does not subside within 72 hours of home care.
Our Clinic’s approach to treating shoulder injuries

The goal of therapy for shoulder injuries is to decrease pain and improve function. Your physiotherapy may include:

  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization
  • Modalities such as ultrasound, laser or electrical stimulation to decrease pain
  • Exercises to help improve posture and stretch and strengthen muscles
  • Education about posture and body mechanics
  • Functional retraining to allow you to gradually resume your previous ADL’s

Shoulder tendinitis is inflammation of the rotator cuff and/or biceps tendon. It is generally a result of the aging process, overuse activities, degenerative disease, poor posture, or acute injury. Shoulder tendinitis may be accompanied by bursitis, which can cause pain when you move or put pressure on the bursa.

Signs and symptoms
Signs and symptoms of shoulder tendinitis include:

  • Pain in the shoulder that is present both with activity and with rest
  • Pain with overhead activities
  • Swelling in the front of the shoulder
  • Decreased range of motion in the shoulder
  • Loss of strength in the shoulder

Our Clinic’s approach to treating shoulder tendinitis
Your physiotherapy for shoulder tendinitis may include:

  • Modalities such as electrical stimulation, ultrasound, laser, ice, heat, and iontophoresis
  • Joint and soft tissue mobilization
  • Exercises to correct posture and regain strength and motion in the shoulder joint
  • Education about ways to modify posture and behaviour to limit further trauma to the shoulder, as well as the importance of stretching and warming up before activity

The spine is one of the most complex areas of the human body, comprising 24 small bones called vertebrae excluding the tailbone. The vertebrae are held together by muscles, tendons, and ligaments and are cushioned by intervertebral discs. Together, these components surround and protect the spinal cord. Regardless of occupation, the accumulated wear and tear our bodies experience daily puts us at risk of experiencing spinal pain, particularly in the lower back. This risk increases with age as the spine degenerates and begins to lose its flexibility, a condition called osteoarthritis.

Common causes
Common causes of spinal pain are:

  • Poor posture
  • Injury to a muscle (strain) or ligament (sprain)
  • Arthritis
  • Disc bulge or narrowing of the spinal canal

Characteristics of spinal pain
Spinal pain may be limited to a specific area of the spine (for example: the neck or lower back) or may radiate to the lower abdomen, groin, or leg. Symptoms such as pins and needles, numbness, or a burning feeling in the leg or foot may indicate irritation to the nerves in the lower back which bring sensation/motor control to the leg.

Risk factors
Factors that increase the risk of back pain include:

  • Inactivity or poor physical fitness
  • Poor posture
  • Increased weight
  • Repetitive stress or improper body mechanics
  • Increasing age

Therapy for back and neck conditions focuses on the structures that support the spine and its joints including muscles, tendons, nerves and ligaments.

Spondylolysis is a stress fracture in one of the spine’s vertebrae. If the stress fracture weakens the bone so much that it cannot maintain its proper position, the vertebra can start to shift out of place. This condition is called spondylolisthesis. If too much slippage occurs, the bones may begin to press on nerves and surgery may be necessary to correct the condition.

Signs and symptoms
Spondylolisthesis often has no obvious symptoms. When symptoms are present, they may include:

  • Pain that spreads across the lower back, feeling like a muscle strain
  • Spasms that stiffen the muscles of the back, resulting in changes to posture and gait

Risk factors
Factors that increase the risk of spondylolisthesis include:

  • Genetics (many people are born with the condition)
  • Activities that put stress on the bones in the lower back and require overstretching the spine (for example: gymnastics, weight lifting, and football)
  • Degenerative diseases such as arthritis
  • Trauma

Our Clinic’s approach to treating spondylolisthesis
Your physiotherapy at Our Clinic for spondylolisthesis may include:

  • Proper bracing to reduce stress on affected structures
  • Modalities such as ultrasound, electric stimulation and heat to reduce pain and muscle spasms
  • Exercises to strengthen the core, especially abdominal and back muscles
  • Education about avoiding activities that do not place your lower back at risk for injury

The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in the body, running from the pelvis through the buttock and hip area and down the back of each leg. It controls many of the muscles in the lower legs and provides sensory and motor control to the thighs, legs, and feet. Sciatica refers to pain that radiates from the buttock to the back of one thigh and into the lower leg. This pain is often caused by a herniated disc in the lower back that is pressing on the nerve roots that make up the sciatic nerve.

Signs and symptoms
Common signs and symptoms of sciatica include:

  • Mild to severe pain, ache, or burning sensation when sitting, sneezing, or coughing
  • Leg weakness
  • Numbness, burning, or tingling sensation in one leg or foot
  • Decreased bladder or bowel control

Risk factors
Factors that increase the risk of sciatica include:

  • Age
  • Job requiring you to twist, carry heavy loads, or drive a motor vehicle for long periods
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Genetic factors
  • Diabetes
  • Trauma

Our Clinic’s approach to treating sciatica
Your physiotherapy at Our Clinic for sciatica may include:

  • Manual therapy techniques to improve spinal mobility
  • Modalities such as electrical stimulation, ultrasound, traction, moist heat/ice
  • Bracing
  • Exercises to help decompress the nerve, improve posture, strengthen muscles, increase flexibility, and help with weight loss
  • Education about proper posture, lifting techniques and avoidance of aggravating factors/activities
  • Stabilization exercises

Preventing Back Pain
Many back injuries can be prevented by learning and practicing proper body mechanics. The following tips can help you maintain your spine’s natural curvature in your daily activity:

  • Lift smart. Let your legs do the work. Bend at the hips and knees, not the back. Hold the load close to your body. Avoid twisting, and push-rather than pull-objects.
  • Sleep smart. Use a firm or medium-firm mattress and pillows for support. When you get out of bed, roll to your side and push up with your arms as your legs fall off the side of the bed.
  • Stand smart. Maintain the natural curvature of the spine. Engage your abdominal muscles to actively support the spine.
  • Sit smart. Maintain the spine’s natural curvature by keeping ears, shoulders, and hips aligned while keeping your chest up. You can also prevent back injuries by improving your physical condition:
  • Exercise aerobically. Regular low-impact aerobic activities can increase strength and endurance.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Excess weight strains your back and abdominal muscles.
  • Build muscle strength and flexibility. Core-strengthening exercises help condition your abdominal, back, and hip muscles.

A shin splint is pain resulting from damage to the muscles along the shin, usually caused by repeated stress to the lower leg. Although this condition usually affects runners, anyone who walks, dances, or performs other activities in which the feet continually hit the ground can suffer from shin splints.
Contributing factors

Factors that contribute to shin splints include:

  • A natural imbalance in the size of opposing muscles in the front and outside parts of the shin
  • Exercising on hard surfaces, inclines/declines, banked tracks, or crowned roads
  • Shoes with poor arch support or ones that do not adequately prevent the feet from rolling inward

Our Clinic’s approach to treating shin splints
Your physiotherapy for shin splints may consist of:

  • Brace or taping to provide support
  • Modalities such as ultrasound, laser or electrical stimulation
  • Exercises to stretch, restore range of motion and strengthen weak muscles in the lower extremity
  • Soft tissue mobilization
  • Education about proper stretching techniques, footwear, and exercise surfaces

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the area where the skull’s temporal bone connects to the lower jaw. This joint opens and closes like a hinge and slides forward, backward, and side to side. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction occurs as a result of anatomic problems within the joint or tension in the muscles surrounding it.

Signs and symptoms of TMJ dysfunction include:

  • Pain in the jaw that accompanies movement or clenching
  • Decreased range of motion in the jaw or locking of the joint
  • Noise during jaw movement
  • Headache

Our Clinic’s approach:
Physiotherapy at Our Clinic for TMJ may include:

  • Manual therapy to increase range of motion in the TMJ region, recapture the displaced TMJ disc, decrease muscle tightness, reduce stress to the jaw joints, and release musculoskeletal trigger points to restore pain-free mobility
  • Modalities including ultrasound, laser, ice/heat to decrease spasm, inflammation and pain
  • Education about posture and movement to reduce inflammation within the joint, regain harmony in the jaw and muscles, improve function and range of motion, and stabilize the bite and TMJ in a neutral physiologic position
  • Self-management activities designed to help you maintain normal, pain-free mobility and function

Lateral epicondylitis is an inflammation of one or more of the tissues (tendons, ligaments, or nerves) in the lateral (outer) side of the elbow and forearm. This condition occurs when the hand and wrist extensor muscles are overused and this leads to tenderness, pain, and swelling in the elbow and forearm. Lateral epicondylitis is one of several overuse injuries that can affect your elbow. It may develop for no obvious reason, and can also be caused by activities other than tennis involving unaccustomed strenuous activity involving the arm and hand.

The pain of lateral epicondylitis occurs primarily where the tendons of your forearm muscles attach to the bony prominence on the outside of your elbow (lateral epicondyle). Pain can also spread into your forearm and wrist. Pain is worse with activities that include gripping and bending the wrist upward. This condition is similar to golfer’s elbow, but golfer’s elbow occurs on the inside – rather than on the outside of your elbow.

Symptoms
The symptoms of tennis elbow include:

  • Severe, burning pain radiating from the outside of your elbow to your forearm and wrist
  • Pain when you extend your wrist or touch or bump the outside of your elbow, gradually worsening over weeks or months
  • Discomfort from lifting even very light objects
  • A weak or painful grip during certain activities, such as turning a doorknob

Our Clinic’s approach to treating tennis elbow
Our Clinic’s approach to treating tennis elbow focuses on minimizing inflammation and irritation to the involved tendon. Your treatment may include:

  • Custom splinting of the w2ist
  • Education on activity modification and body mechanics
  • Therapeutic modalities to relieve inflammation and pain
  • Manual techniques to minimize scar formation
  • Exercises to gradually strengthen and recondition the involved muscles

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