Spinal Decompression

Relief Of Pain Due To Bulging Or Herniated Disc

Nonsurgical Spinal Decompression

A safe and gentle technique for stretching and relaxing the spine. Spinal decompression therapy is clinically proven effective for relieving mild-moderate pain associated with bulging or herniated discs, particularly in the lumbar spine. By reducing the pressure within the spinal discs, patients experience associated relief from lower back and neck pain.

Patients who present as good candidates for nonsurgical decompression therapy should plan for 12-15 treatments over a 4-week schedule.

Request a consultation to see if you are a good candidate for nonsurgical spinal decompression therapy.

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Low Back Pain 

Low Back Pain (LBP) affects about 40% of people sometime in their lives. This pain can vary from mild to severe. Acute or short-term low back pain generally lasts from a few days to a few weeks. Low back pain that persists for more than 3 months is considered chronic. Regardless of how long it lasts, it can make everyday activities difficult to do. 

The low back bears most of the bodys weight so it is pretty easy to hurt your back when you lift, reach or twist. In addition, as people age, bone strength, muscle elasticity and tone tend to decrease. The discs begin to lose fluid and flexibility, which decreases their ability to cushion the vertebrae. 

Pain can occur when, for example, someone lifts something too heavy or overstretches, causing a sprain, strain, or spasm in one of the muscles or ligaments in the back. If the spine becomes overly strained or compressed, a disc may rupture or bulge outward. This rupture may put pressure on one of the more than fifty nerves rooted to the spinal cord that control body movements and transmit signals from the body to the brain. When these nerve roots become compressed or irritated, back pain results. 

Neck Pain 

Neck pain is discomfort in any of the structures in the neck. These include the muscles, nerves, bones (vertebrae), and the disks between the bones. Neck pain may arise due to muscular tightness in both the neck and upper back, or pinching of the nerves emanating from the cervical vertebrae. Joint disruption in the neck creates pain, as does joint disruption in the upper back.  

The head is supported by the lower neck and upper back, and it is these areas that commonly cause neck pain. The top three joints in the neck allow for most movement of the neck and head. The lower joints in the neck and those of the upper back create a supportive structure for the head to sit on. If this support system is affected adversely, then the muscles in the area will tighten, leading to neck pain. 

When your neck is sore, you may have difficulty moving it, especially turning to one side. Many people describe this as having a stiff neck. If neck pain involves nerves, you may feel numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arm, hand, or elsewhere. Neck muscles can be strained from poor posture — whether it’s leaning into your computer at work or hunching over your workbench at home. Wear-and-tear arthritis also is a common cause of neck pain.  

Herniated Disc

Disc herniation is usually due to age-related degeneration, or trauma, or lifting injuries. Slipped disks occur more often in middle-aged and older men, usually after strenuous activity. In many circumstances, disc herniations can be successfully treated with medication, physical therapy, and steroid injections performed by a pain management specialist.